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Turning Waste Paper Into


Cellulose Insulation

Fiberlite recycles tons of waste paper daily, turning it into an amazing array of cellulose insulation products to improve the energy efficiency and comfort of homes and commercial buildings for the people who occupy them. Let us help you insulate to save money on your utility bills and make your home or workplace more quiet and comfortable.


 


 






Key Performance Features

It is crucial for industry professionals to have access to accurate information when considering insulation products for their clients. Benefits and performance values vary with each different type of insulation available. This table provides a straightforward comparison to help Architects, Builders and Insulation Contractors determine which insulation product is the best for the particular needs of their clients.

PDF file Table of Key Performance Features (PDF)

Feature
Fiberlite's Cellulose Insulation
Blown Fiberglass
Fiberglass Batts
Cotton Batts
Open-cell low-density polyurethane Sprayed Foam (Soy)
Close-cell spray polyurethane Sprayed Foam
Comments
 
R-Value per inch 3.75 2.2-4.0 3.7 3.0-3.7 3.6-3.8 5.8-6.8 Higher the number, a better R-Value can be achieved with less thickness.  
Mold Resistant + - - - - - FTI's Cellulose Insulation is one of the few companies whose product resists mold.  
Meets air barrier requirements without extra materials and work - - - - - + Spray Foam is an effective air barrier however house wraps, joint sealed OSB, plywood, and gypsum drywall are also air barriers. Visit www.airbarrier.org or www.buildingscience.com regarding the importance of walls to breathe.  
Easily Insulates Irregular or Hard-to-Reach Spaces + + - - + + Difficult for batt materials to achieve. Easy to achieve with sprayed or blown materials; whether cellulose, fiberglass, or foam.  
Prevents Heat Loss through
~ Convection
~ Conduction
~ Air Infiltration
~ Radiation


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Don’t fall into the trap of only looking at R-Value when comparing insulations.  
No HFAs, HCFCs, or HFCs used. + + + + + - Close-cell polyurethane contains HFC-245fa blowing agent which can have an impact on global warming.  
Contains No Asbestos, Formaldehyde, Urea or Ammonia + - - + + + Members of the Fiberglass industry have introduced a Formaldehyde Free product in recent years although not all fiberglass products are.  
No Harmful Emissions after Installation or Drying + + + + - - Although no harmful emissions are present after installation or drying, both polyurethane products are quite toxic during installation and require respirators or supplied air. Several days are required for airing out the property before occupancy.  
Can be Injected in Closed Cavities + + - - + + Cellulose insulation was the original material used for this application and remains the preferred material by Federal Weatherization programs. Some foam products require bracing every 3 feet for piping and wiring to resist movement by expanding foam.  
Blown attic insulation settles after installation + + - - - - This is a well understood process as excess air moves quickly out of blown-in insulation after installation. The packaging identifies correct depth to be installed so, after a brief settling period, it will achieve the desired R-Value.  
“Wick Water” + - - - - - You shouldn’t get water in the wall but if you do, you want water to dissipate via wicking to accelerate drying rather than pooling water in a spot. Cellulose insulation passes ASTM C739 Moisture Vapor Absorption test  
Not Damaged by Water - - - - + + All insulation materials lose R-value when exposed to water because the water fills trapped air spaces even if it does not directly affect the insulation material. Water is not desired for any building material.  
Controls Airborne Sound Transfer + + + + + + Foams, cellulose, and fiberglass reduce sound transmission.